Medications


Valproic Acid, Divalproex Sodium injection

What is this medicine?

VALPROATE SODIUM (val PRO ate SO dee um) is used to treat certain types of seizures in patients with epilepsy.

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for infusion into a vein. It is given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 10 years for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • changes in vision

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • signs and symptoms of liver injury like dark yellow or brown urine; general ill feeling or flu-like symptoms; light-colored stools; loss of appetite; nausea; right upper belly pain; unusually weak or tired; yellowing of the eyes or skin

  • suicidal thoughts or other mood changes

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • constipation

  • diarrhea

  • dizziness

  • hair loss

  • headache

  • loss of appetite

  • weight gain

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • sodium phenylbutyrate

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • aspirin

  • certain antibiotics like ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem

  • certain medicines for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances

  • certain medicines for seizures like carbamazepine, clonazepam, diazepam, ethosuximide, felbamate, lamotrigine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, rufinamide, topiramate

  • certain medicines that treat or prevent blood clots like warfarin

  • female hormones, like estrogens and birth control pills, patches, or rings

  • propofol

  • rifampin

  • ritonavir

  • tolbutamide

  • zidovudine

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply.

Where should I keep my medicine?

This drug is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • if you often drink alcohol

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • low platelet counts

  • mitochondrial disease

  • suicidal thoughts, plans, or attempt; a previous suicide attempt by you or a family member

  • urea cycle disorder (UCD)

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, valproic acid, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or healthcare professional if your symptoms do not get better or they start to get worse.

Wear a medical ID bracelet or chain, and carry a card that describes your disease and details of your medicine and dosage times.

You may get drowsy, dizzy, or have blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. To reduce dizzy or fainting spells, do not sit or stand up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. Alcohol can increase drowsiness and dizziness. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

This medicine can make you more sensitive to the sun. Keep out of the sun. If you cannot avoid being in the sun, wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or tanning beds/booths.

Patients and their families should watch out for new or worsening depression or thoughts of suicide. Also watch out for sudden changes in feelings such as feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, overly excited and hyperactive, or not being able to sleep. If this happens, especially at the beginning of treatment or after a change in dose, call your health care professional.

Women should inform their doctor if they wish to become pregnant or think they might be pregnant. There is a potential for serious side effects to an unborn child. Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist for more information. Women who become pregnant while using this medicine may enroll in the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry by calling 1-888-233-2334. This registry collects information about the safety of antiepileptic drug use during pregnancy.


NOTE:This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider. Copyright© 2017 Elsevier
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