Medications


Factor X injection

What is this medicine?

FACTOR X (FAK tor TEN) is used in patients with hereditary factor X deficiency to control bleeding.

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection into a vein. It is usually given by a healthcare professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

If you get this medicine at home, you will be taught how to prepare and give this medicine. Use exactly as directed. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 12 years for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • back pain

  • pain at site where injected

  • tiredness

What may interact with this medicine?

This medicine may interact with the following medications:

  • apixaban

  • edoxaban

  • prothrombin complex concentrate

  • rivaroxaban

What if I miss a dose?

It is important not to miss your dose. Call your doctor or health care professional if you are unable to keep an appointment. If you give yourself the medicine and you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

This drug is usually given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.

In rare cases, this medicine may be given at home. If you are using this medicine at home, you will be instructed on how to store this medicine. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date on the label.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to factor X, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

You may need blood work while you are taking this medicine.

Your condition will be monitored carefully while you are receiving this medicine.

If you are a hemophilia patient, wear a medical ID bracelet or chain, and carry a card that describes your disease and details of your medicine and dosage times.


NOTE:This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider. Copyright© 2017 Elsevier
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