Medications


Carbamazepine Solution for injection

What is this medicine?

CARBAMAZEPINE (kar ba MAZ e peen) is used to control seizures caused by certain types of epilepsy.

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for infusion into a vein. It is usually given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

If you get this medicine at home, you will be taught how to prepare and give this medicine. Use exactly as directed. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • breathing problems

  • changes in vision

  • confusion

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • mouth sores

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • ringing in the ears

  • seizures

  • signs and symptoms of infection like fever or chills; cough; sore throat; pain or trouble passing urine

  • signs and symptoms of kidney injury like trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • signs and symptoms of liver injury like dark yellow or brown urine; general ill feeling or flu-like symptoms; light-colored stools; loss of appetite; nausea; right upper belly pain; unusually weak or tired; yellowing of the eyes or skin

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

  • worsening of mood, thoughts or actions of suicide or dying

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report these to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • constipation

  • diarrhea

  • headache

  • increased sweating

  • nausea

  • pain, redness, or irritation at site where injected

  • tiredness

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • artemether; lumefantrine

  • certain antiviral medicines for hepatitis

  • certain antiviral medicines for HIV or AIDS

  • certain medicines for fungal infections like isavuconazomium, voriconazole

  • lurasidone

  • MAOIs like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate

  • nefazodone

  • nifedipine

  • ranolazine

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • acetaminophen

  • aminophylline

  • aprepitant

  • buprenorphine

  • certain antibiotics like ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, erythromycin, isoniazid, rifampin, troleandomycin

  • certain antiviral medicines for HIV or AIDS

  • certain medicines for anxiety or sleep

  • certain medicines for blood pressure like amlodipine, diltiazem, felodipine, verapamil

  • certain medicines for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances

  • certain medicines for fungal infections like ketoconazole and itraconazole

  • certain medicines for seizures like ethosuximide, felbamate, fosphenytoin, lamotrigine, methsuximide, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, tiagabine, topiramate, valproic acid, zonisamide

  • certain medicines for stomach problems like cimetidine, omeprazole

  • danazol

  • dantrolene

  • diuretics

  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills, patches, rings, or injections

  • grapefruit juice

  • ibuprofen

  • levothyroxine

  • loratadine

  • medicines for angina or high blood pressure

  • medicines for cancer

  • medicines that lower your chance of fighting infection

  • medicines that relax muscles for surgery

  • methadone

  • niacinamide

  • oxybutynin

  • praziquantel

  • steroid medicines like prednisone or cortisone

  • tadalafil

  • theophylline

  • ticlopidine

  • tramadol

  • warfarin

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

If you are using this medicine at home, you will be instructed on how to store this medicine. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date on the label.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • Asian ancestry

  • bone marrow disease

  • glaucoma

  • heart disease

  • history of irregular heartbeat

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • low blood counts, like low white cell, platelet, or red cell counts

  • mental illness

  • porphyria

  • suicidal thoughts, plans, or attempt; a previous suicide attempt by you or a family member

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to carbamazepine, tricyclic antidepressants, phenytoin, phenobarbital, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or healthcare professional if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse.

You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks.

Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice. You may develop a severe reaction. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take.

Tell your doctor or health care professional right away if you have any change in your eyesight.

Birth control pills may not work properly while you are taking this medicine. Talk to your doctor about using an extra method of birth control.

This medicine can make you more sensitive to the sun. Keep out of the sun. If you cannot avoid being in the sun, wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or tanning beds/booths.

If you or your family notice any changes in your behavior, such as new or worsening depression, thoughts of harming yourself, anxiety, other unusual or disturbing thoughts, or memory loss, call your doctor right away.

Women who become pregnant while using this medicine may enroll in the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry by calling 1-888-233-2334. This registry collects information about the safety of antiepileptic drug use during pregnancy.


NOTE:This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider. Copyright© 2017 Elsevier
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